The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

MeHee Hyun, Ph.D.
Core Faculty, Prior Learning Coordinator, BA in Liberal Studies

“Whimsical” seems too frivolous a word, yet it is an apt beginning to describe this invitation to re-think language and how we negotiate growing up, what music looks like, and whether letters or numbers are more important. This quirky children’s book launches you into a journey—navigated by a boy, a watchdog (who has a clock for his body), and a humbug—that requires a search for the two Princesses, Rhyme and Reason. I read this as a child and it forever changed the way I think about language, and it remains a precious favorite for me and my oldest child. I am about to read it to my youngest child for the first time, and I am relishing, once again, opening this guidebook to new worlds.

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Broken Kingdoms: Fifty Years of “The Phantom Tollbooth,” by Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker.

The Road to Dictionopolis, an interview with Norton Juster by Laura Miller, Salon.

NPR celebrates The Phantom Tollbooth and its author.

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Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss

Josh Williams
Director of Student Advocacy and Services

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss is a whimsical and inspirational book that I read to my children when they were younger and still sits on their bookshelf today. It was a favorite of ours and I loved its message. It’s a reminder that we’re all travelers and we should enjoy the ride no matter how challenging the journey may be.

Congratulations!
Today is your day.
You’re off to Great Places!
You’re off and away!

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The Political Dr. Seuss, PBS’s documentary about the writer. “Many readers didn’t know that The Sneetches was inspired by Seuss’s opposition to anti-Semitism, that Horton Hears a Who! was a political statement about democracy and isolationism, or that The Lorax and The Butter Battle Book were parables about the environment and the arms race.”

A slant view.

Commencement Poem, Theodor Seuss Geisel, Lake Forest College, June 4, 1977.

Find this book at your local public library!